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20121208
20121208
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about rock of ages, the big surprise. we have nine states that have done it. in this past election, which i think is pivotal, four states did it completely by popular vote. no court ruling on rights, just public will. >> for the first time in 40 years in four states thanks to the efforts of chad and a lot of other people, for the first time there was a populist vote, and the people spoke. they have never spoken in favor before, but there are really two ways. it's also equal protection under the law and also that the court has found it to be a fundamental right. this is an extraordinary, extraordinary time, and -- >> let's cut this in two. there's two questions here. one is doma, the defense of marriage act. this administration will not defend it in the courts. if that gets struck down, what does that say to cases around the country where people have been allowed to marry in the same gender? chad, on that. what happens it doma gets struck down by the court, 5-4 or whatever? >> the ridiculously named defense of marriage act would be gone obviously. >> what would it mean to a gay pers
ahead and affirm that i think same sex couples should be able to get married. >> reporter: on election day last month, voters approved gay marriage at the ballot box for the first time, after dozens of defeats, when maine, maryland and washington state legalized it. but now, it all comes down to the nine justices of the supreme court, and they are generally conservative on social issues, though they're closely divided. for opponents of gay marriage, the very fabric of our society is at stake. >> the fundamental reason why marriage is treated as a public institution rather than a purely private relationship is because it serves the interest of society and the interest of children. >> reporter: edie windsor thinks it's simpler than all that. if you could talk to the supreme court as they consider this case, what would you tell them? >> it's a marriage that anyone would want, okay, gay or straight. we had a wonderful life together. >> and terry, right here again. so, when will the court rule on this and do you have any sense at all which may they may go? >> reporter: so they've got two ca
or their elected representatives to stake with traditional marriage. >> reporter: for paul and jeff, the supreme court decision is personal. they launched the challenge to prop 8 seeking the right to marry. >> sometimes the court system needs to nudge us forward to be a better, more united america. >> reporter: the court could rule in a way that impacts same- sex marriage only in california and does not affect the rest of the country. >> movements are a mix of things and you have to kind of take the ups with the downs. >> reporter: the court will hear the marriage cases in march. a decision will probably come by the end of june. john blackstone, cbs news, san francisco. >> pelley: john, thank you. the court also said today it will hear a second case on same- sex marriage. that case is a challenge to the current law that denies married same-sex couples the same federal benefits as other married couples. we checked with the census bureau today and they told us there are just over 600,000 same-sex couple households in olerica today. most states-- 38-- ban same-sex marriages. nine states and the dis
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